After advertising the sale of your vehicle, you receive a phone call from a potential buyer. The caller claims to be unable to collect the car personally, suggesting to arrange pickup by a forwarding company. To win your trust, the person suggests to send you a payment confirmation from an online payment service in advance. On the arranged date, the assigned forwarding company has someone pick up the vehicle against a receipt. Subsequently, the fraudster denies ever having received the vehicle and “freezes” the supposedly transferred money. In this way, the fraudster undermines the basically useful buyer protection of the online payment system. However, since the receipt from the forwarding company is not suitable to prove beyond doubt that the buyer did actually receive the car, the payment is usually refunded to the “buyer” after a few weeks. Should a potential buyer propose this procedure, you should actively address the problems involved.

Another variant of this scheme is that the alleged buyer sends a third party to meet with the seller to conclude the contract and/or to take possession of the car. This proxy produces a fake power of attorney and copies of the alleged buyer’s identity papers. The ID papers are usually stolen from a third party. As proof of payment of the purchase price, the proxy produces a fake e-mail confirmation/receipt of the bank transfer. After the purchase, the vehicle is sold to a buyer who has no knowledge of the previous fraud scheme but who cannot rightfully gain ownership of the car and who is obliged to return it to the original owner. This scheme defrauds both the original seller, who never gets the purchase price and the subsequent buyer who cannot obtain the car or who has to return it if obtained. When the private seller is not inscribed in the vehicle papers as the owner, buyers should always be prudent and verify whether they are dealing with a legitimate seller. The seller’s claim that he/she is a commercial reseller and the fact that he/she is in possession of the vehicle papers and keys do not set aside the prospective buyer’s duty to verify the seller’s legitimacy. Buyers should further be aware that a confirmation (printout) of a bank transfer does not mean that the funds have actually been credited to the seller’s account.

Insist that the buyer pick up the vehicle personally and sign a sales contract with subsequent payment in cash. If the person refuses, you should become suspicious and terminate your contact with them.

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RISHI KUMAR comments on:

DEAR ALL , AT PRESENT I AM HAVING E-MAILS EXCHANGE FOR BUYING ONE CAR. ITS SAME FRAUDE IN WHICH THEY WANT ME TO TRANSFER 4000 EUROS ON MY NAME ONLY [...]

MatasB comments on:

ATENTION! Here is my experience with one fucker (scam/fraud). His "so-called" name is Hampus Lindberg He "lives" in Sweden, Malmo. He sells blue [...]

th. comments on:

Auto VW T4 Blackline günstig angeboten über Mobile de und angeblicher Wohnort in der Schweiz in Saanen (Martin Poulsen) . Gleiche Masche mit Transf [...]

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